What is an intercultural city?

Intercultural cities have a diverse population including people of different nationalities and origins, and with different languages or religions/beliefs.

Most citizens regard diversity as a resource not a problem and accept that all cultures change as they encounter each other in the public arena.

The city officials publicly advocate respect for diversity and a pluralistic city identity. The city actively combats prejudice and discrimination and ensures equal opportunities for all by adapting its governance structures, institutions and services to the needs of a diverse population, without compromising the principles of human rights, democracy and the rule of law.

In partnership with business, civil society and public service professionals, the intercultural city develops a range of policies and actions to encourage more mixing and interaction between diverse groups.

The high level of trust and social cohesion helps to prevent conflicts and violence, increase policy effectiveness and make the city attractive for people and investors alike.

Intercultural Cities: How it works?

The successful cities of the future will be those best able to harness the talent and energy of their diverse citizens. A city can minimize the threats and maximize the potential of diversity by developing, negotiating and implementing a comprehensive strategy to realize its diversity advantage.

The Intercultural Cities programme helps cities to devise such strategies cutting across institutional silos and mobilizing leaders, policy officers, professionals, businesses and civil society behind a new model of integration based on the mixing and interaction between people from different ethnic, religious and linguistic backgrounds.

The programme helps cities to:

  • Create a sense of pluralistic identitybased on the pride and appreciation of its diverse population and minimize ethnic tension and conflict.
  • Set up a governance model empowering all members of the community, regardless of their origin or status, and thus benefit from their talents, skills and links with developing markets.
  • Break the walls between ethnic groups, build trust and thus ensure cohesion and solidarity.
  • Make the public space and services accessible to alland end the vicious circle of poverty and exclusion which goes hand in hand with ethnic segregation.
  • Empower intercultural innovators in public institutions and civil societyand through them ensure that policies encourage intercultural interaction.
  • Build a positive discourseand encourage a balanced approach to diversity in media to foster positive public perception of migrant and minority groups.

TheIntercultural cities network provides expert and peer support to citieswhich chose to learn how to better manage diversity and benefit from the diversity advantage. It offers an internationally tested and validated methodology and a set of analytical and learning tools, as well as help with re-shaping city policies and services to make them more effective in a diverse context, and to engage citizens in building an understanding of their diversity as a competitive advantage.

What do member cities do?

Following the accession process, member cities set up anintercultural support groupand start the process ofreviewing different urban policiesfrom an intercultural perspective, re-shaping them and integrating them into a comprehensive policy strategy. Detailed guidelines for this process are provided in the Step-by-step Guide to Buidling the Intercultural City.

The cities areencouraged to involve citizensbroadly in the strategy development process, in identifying indicators for success, monitoring progress and implementation. A methodological guide for this work is available, as well as excellent moderators/advisers.

In order to support this process, theCouncil of Europe provides experts and facilitators for the policy discussionswithin the city. To motivate and help city officials and other local stakeholders learn from the experience of other cities, it organizes (and funds, including travel/subsistence for city delegates) thematic workshops and study visits. High-level meetings are also organized for the city leaders to exchange and manifest/reinforce their commitment.

Intercultural cities experts

A range of international experts participate to support the Intercultural cities programme.

Their tasks include, inter alia:

  • Drafting analytical reports on cities’ results on the Intercultural cities’ index;
  • Participating in monitoring visits and preparing reports such as the Intercultural profiles of member cities;
  • Providing advice to cities in the context of the preparation of their intercultural strategies;
  • Preparing thematic events and drafting reports and policy briefs based on the results;
  • Providing advice and training in specific areas (eg myth-busting, intercultural competence, political communication);
  • Providing policy advice in specific areas (education, culture, housing, economic development, social services, urban planning, impact evaluation etc.);
  • Managing national intercultural cities networks;
  • Designing and managing specific projects (eg. awareness campaigns).

List of participating cities (121):

Agadir(Morocco)

Albufeira(Portugal)

Amadora (Portugal)

Arezzo (Italy)

Ballarat(Australia)

Barcelona(Spain)

Bari (Italy)

Beja(Portugal)

Bergen(Norway)

Berlin-Neukölln(Germany)

Bilbao(Spain)

Botkyrka(Sweden)

Braga(Portugal)

Bucharest(Romania)

Bursa-Osmangazi(Turkey)

Campi Bisenzio (Italy)

Capannori (Italy)

Cartagena (Spain)

Casalecchio di Reno(Italy)

Casablanca(Morocco)

Cascais(Portugal)

Castellón de la Plana(Spain)

Chefchaouen(Morocco)

Coimbra(Portugal)

Copenhagen(Denmark)

Constanta(Romania)

Donostia / San Sebastian (Spain)

Dortmund(Germany)

Drammen(Norway)

Duisburg (Germany)

Dublin(Ireland)

Erlangen(Germany)

Fermo (Italy)

Forlì(Italy)

Fucecchio (Italy)

Fuenlabrada(Spain)

Geneva(Switzerland)

Genova(Italy)

Getafe(Spain)

Getxo(Spain)

Haifa(Israel)

Hamamatsu(Japan)

Hamburg(Germany)

Ioannina(Greece)

Izhevsk(Russian Federation)

Jerez de la Frontera(Spain)

Klaksvík(Feroe islands)

Kenitra(Morocco)

Kristiansand(Norway)

Larache(Morocco)

Limassol(Cyprus)

Limerick(Ireland)

Lisbon(Portugal)

Lodi(Italy)

Logroño(Spain)

London Lewisham(United Kingdom)

Loures(Portugal)

Lublin(Poland)

Lutsk(Ukraine)

Lyon(France)

Málaga(Spain)

Marrakech(Morocco)

Martil(Morocco)

Mechelen(Belgium)

Meknes(Morocco)

Melitopol(Ukraine)

Mexico city(Mexico)

Milano(Italy)

Montreal (Canada)

Munich (Germany)

Neuchâtel(Switzerland)

Novellara (Italy)

Odessa (Ukraine)

Offenburg (Germany)

Olbia(Italy)

Oslo(Norway)

Palermo(Italy)

Paris(France)

Parla (Spain)

Patras(Greece)

Pavlohrad (Ukraine)

Pécs(Hungary)

Pizzo (Italy)

Pompei (Italy)

Pontedera(Italy)

Portimao(Portugal)

Rabat(Morocco)

Ravenna (Italy)

Reggio-Emilia(Italy)

Reykjavik(Iceland)

Rijeka (Croatia)

Rotterdam(Netherlands)

Sabadell(Spain)

San Giuliano Terme(Italy)

Santa Coloma de Gramenet(Spain)

Santa Maria da Feira(Portugal)

Savignano sul Rubicone(Italy)

Senigallia (Italy)

Setúbal (Portugal)

Stavanger(Norway)

Strasbourg(France)

Subotica(Serbia)

Sumy (Ukraine)

Swansea(United Kingdom)

Tanger(Morocco)

Tenerife(Spain)

Tetouan(Morocco)

Tilburg(Netherlands)

Trondheim(Norway)

Torino(Italy)

Tortosa(Spain)

Turnhout (Belgium)

Un.dei C. Terre dei Castelli(Italy)

Valletta(Malta)

Västerås(Sweden)

Venice(Italy)

Viareggio (Italy)

Vinnytsia(Ukraine)

Viseu(Portugal)

Zaragoza(Spain)

Zurich(Switzerland)

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11.10.2017
Department of information and analytics of the Izhevsk City Administration © 1998-2019

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